Tea Mag’s Coverage of Yellow Tea

by Jason Walker on March 6, 2013

in Chinese, review, Voices of Tea

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Yellow Tea 1There is much to discuss in the latest issue of Tea Mag:

The published content does well explaining the basic concepts of how yellow tea differs from green tea.

I wish they had talked about what to expect the tea tasting experience to encompass. It is true that reputable vendors with quality yellow tea are few and far between. I am more inclined to trust yellow tea from Seven Cups and Jing Tea.

It has been a while since I’ve had any. I need to dig into my cabinet and remind myself of its beauty. I do recall very mild astringency like starchiness with flavor components close to yellow bean sprout, or fresh tender bamboo sprout.

Yellow Tea 2I’m sure Tea Mag will do some touching-up soon.

Until they do, a few things to note about their coverage of Yellow Tea:

If you go to the supplementary yellow tea material on Tea Mag’s page, there are some useful gems.

1. The Story of Tea and Camellia Sinensis Tea House’s book do give more info on yellow teas and their production.

2. Material from Seven Cups is valuable and reliable.

Then there are a few things there that (hopefully) will be cleaned up soon:

1. Some links seem broken, or out of date. For example, I never could get the yellowtea.net link to work, and Google could not find it either.

2. Basic fact-check didn’t catch some errors. Jun Shan, near Dong Ting Lake, is correctly described as in Hunan Province. But there is a link to an image of Dong Ting Lake (related to Bi Luo Chun green tea). The Dong Ting associated with bi luo chun is over 400 miles away in Jiangsu Province.

What I would add:

Yellow tea can get further distinguished into the traditional and better-known types like Jun Shan Yin Zhen, Meng Ding Huang Ya, and Mo Gan Huang Ya. Vicony Teas and this BaiDu entry explain how there are also general categories of yellow tea, like Yellow Little Leaf and Yellow Large Leaf. There are specifically named yellow teas within each of those categories. I have seen Huo Shan Huang Ya on the market, and I believe I have seen Huang Shan Huang Ya at least once.

If you want to see yellow tea places on a map, I’ve added a few yellow pins here.


Get even more in the Member Content.
Walker Tea Review- a tea blog with tea reviews and tea tastings.
Want to see a tea reviewed? Contact me: jason@walkerteareview.com

Subscribe in a reader or by email

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Previous post:

Next post: